Wes Hill@tumblr

Apr 23

dashingprinceorhornytoad:

Dev Hynes + Solange

dashingprinceorhornytoad:

Dev Hynes + Solange

[video]

(Source: asaprockyhq, via iranye-west)

inneroptics:

Francesc Català-Roca - Marcel Duchamp

inneroptics:

Francesc Català-Roca - Marcel Duchamp

inneroptics:

Michael Kenna- Portrait of Atget

inneroptics:

Michael Kenna- Portrait of Atget

wmagazine:

Kate’s sister, Lottie Moss
Photograph by Sarah Piantadosi; styled by Felicia Garcia-Rivera; W magazine May 2014. 

wmagazine:

Kate’s sister, Lottie Moss

Photograph by Sarah Piantadosi; styled by Felicia Garcia-Rivera; W magazine May 2014. 

[video]

theories-of:

Sigmar Polke, Untitled, c. 1975, Gelatin silver print, 18 x 23.9 cm

theories-of:

Sigmar Polke, Untitled, c. 1975, Gelatin silver print, 18 x 23.9 cm

theatlantic:

Meaningful Activities Protect the Brain From Depression

Our entire lives, when you think about it, are built around rewards — the pursuit of money, fun, love, and tacos.
How we seek and respond to those rewards is part of what determines our overall happiness. Aristotle famously said there were two basic types of joy: hedonia, or that keg-standing, Netflix binge-watching, Nutella-from-the-jar selfish kind of pleasure, and eudaimonia, or the pleasure that comes from helping others, doing meaningful work, and otherwise leading a life well-lived.
Recent psychological research has suggested that this second category is more likely to produce a lasting increase in happiness. Hedonic rewards may generate a short-term burst of glee, but it dissipates more quickly than the surge created by the more selfless eudaimonic rewards.
"Happiness without meaning characterizes a relatively shallow, self-absorbed or even selfish life, in which things go well, needs and desire are easily satisfied, and difficult or taxing entanglements are avoided," a study in the Journal of Positive Psychology found last year.
Read more. [Image: Natesh Ramasamy/flickr/Olga Khazan]

theatlantic:

Meaningful Activities Protect the Brain From Depression

Our entire lives, when you think about it, are built around rewards — the pursuit of money, fun, love, and tacos.

How we seek and respond to those rewards is part of what determines our overall happiness. Aristotle famously said there were two basic types of joy: hedonia, or that keg-standing, Netflix binge-watching, Nutella-from-the-jar selfish kind of pleasure, and eudaimonia, or the pleasure that comes from helping others, doing meaningful work, and otherwise leading a life well-lived.

Recent psychological research has suggested that this second category is more likely to produce a lasting increase in happiness. Hedonic rewards may generate a short-term burst of glee, but it dissipates more quickly than the surge created by the more selfless eudaimonic rewards.

"Happiness without meaning characterizes a relatively shallow, self-absorbed or even selfish life, in which things go well, needs and desire are easily satisfied, and difficult or taxing entanglements are avoided," a study in the Journal of Positive Psychology found last year.

Read more. [Image: Natesh Ramasamy/flickr/Olga Khazan]

bitkoin:

Peter Halley, Blue Cell with Triple Conduit, 1986

bitkoin:

Peter Halley, Blue Cell with Triple Conduit, 1986

(via candyflossanddeathcults)

v-eck:

Erwin Wurm, fat car, 2001

v-eck:

Erwin Wurm, fat car, 2001

(via candyflossanddeathcults)

aubreylstallard:

Andy Johnson, Kraftwerk: Record Mirror, 1978

aubreylstallard:

Andy Johnson, Kraftwerk: Record Mirror, 1978

(Source: magictransistor, via candyflossanddeathcults)

wmagazine:

Free Winona
Polaroid courtesy of Robert Rich. 

wmagazine:

Free Winona

Polaroid courtesy of Robert Rich. 

[video]

deauthier:

Louis Vuitton F/W 2013-14

deauthier:

Louis Vuitton F/W 2013-14

(via uselesschildren)